Economic Security






The economic security of individuals and families is essential to achieving the values of American society. For complex reasons, this financial security is beyond the means of many in our community. 

The median household income in our region was $55,000 in 2013-17, a decrease of 14% from 2000. This was lower than the $62,800 in the state and $57,700 in the nation. The City of Rochester had the lowest median income in the region and the highest rate of poverty, with 33% of its residents living below the poverty line.

The poverty rate was 14% in the region and 12% in the counties surrounding Monroe in 2013-17, slightly less than state and national rates (both 15%). Since 2000, the poverty rate in the region increased by 4 points, while the state rate remained steady.

Household incomes varied greatly among our region's racial and ethnic groups, with African American and Hispanic residents earning less (median incomes of $28,900 and $31,700, respectively) and living in poverty at higher rates (35% and 33% respectively). Household incomes of whites were nearly twice as high as those of African Americans and Hispanics. Poverty rates were higher in the City of Rochester: 42% for Hispanics, 40% for African Americans, 33% for Asians and 25% for white residents.

As young people begin their transition to adulthood, their engagement in school or work is important to their future financial prospects. Yet in our region, 6% of youth ages 16 to 19 were not in school or working in 2013-17.

As the economy declined, the rate of people receiving public assistance in the region and state increased since 2008 but has been decreasing since 2015Monroe County had the highest rate in 2017, about three times greater than surrounding counties, but also the lowest rate of approving applications for assistance (22% in 2017).

The share of regional households receiving federal food assistance has remained elevated since the 2008 recession, with 14% participating in SNAP (Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program). Rates were higher among households headed by people of color, with 43% of black or African-Americans and 41% of Hispanic or Latinos in our region participating in 2013-17, in comparison to 10% of white residents. 








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INDICATORS - Grouped by Topic REGIONAL VALUE YEAR NYS COMPARISON TREND | REGION
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